“From my Nietzschean/Spenglerian point of view, mere conservatism is not really an alternative to decadence. Instead, it is a form of decadence, for a healthy organism does not merely preserve or repeat the past, but carries it forward and transforms it creatively.”
“In the gray herds of sheep, wolves lie concealed, which is to say, beings that still know what freedom is. And these wolves are not only themselves very strong, but there also exists the risk that, on a bad day, these might pass on their qualities to the masses, turning them from dumb herds to aggressive packs. This is the nightmare of the rulers.”
Ernst Jünger, The Forest Passage (via hierarchical-aestheticism)

(via hierarchical-aestheticism)

“Ye solitaries of today, ye seceding ones, ye shall one day be a people: out of you who have chosen among yourselves, shall a chosen people arise:—and out of it the Superman.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, from Thus Spake Zarathurstra (via heartbloodspirit)
“Let us face ourselves. We are Hyperboreans; we know very well how far off we live.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, The Anti-Christ (via ridedatigah)

(via beyondthenorthernsky)

“I don’t want petty self-expression, I want the elemental, infinite thing; I want to paint the rhythm of eternity.”
Rockwell Kent (via hierarchical-aestheticism)

(via longhornthunder)

“In reaching out to explore the distant hills where the gods dwell and the deeps where the monsters are lurking, we are perhaps discovering the way home.”
— H. R. Ellis Davidson, Gods and Myths, 1964 (via torchandhailstone)

(via blasvartr)

As suggested above, sons were not the property of the father in Lycurgan Sparta, but the common property of the state. Unlike other Greek and Roman states, in Sparta the decision to raise a child rested with a council of elders who checked babies for health and stamina. If one was ill born and deformed it was discarded, as life “which nature had not well equipped at the very beginning for health and strength was of no advantage either for itself or the state.”

In many cases, Spartan children were not even the product of random parentage, “but designed to spring from the best there was.” Eugenics. During his time of exile, Lycurgus noticed something peculiar about Greek men. In Athens, Plutarch explains, he saw men arguing over the particular breeding stock of certain dogs and horses. And yet, these same men sired children even though “foolish, infirm, or diseased, as though children of bad stock did not owe their badness to their parents.” Marriages and births were carefully regulated, then, always with an eye to the physical and political wellbeing of the city.

Because of the Lycurgan exaggeration of the Greek educational ideal, Plutarch exclaimed that the education of Spartan children began before birth – an extraordinary concept, considering the 7th Century (B.C.) context. In reality it began prior to conception. Which brings us to Spartan women as mothers. Uniquely in the Classical Greek world, Spartan women exercised alongside men. They ran, wrestled, and threw the discuss and javelin, so that they might struggle successfully and easily with childbirth, and that their offspring would have a “vigorous root in vigorous bodies.”

artamanen:

…No comments… -_-

(via vandrare)

taylornugent:

art—gallery:

 An Athlete Wrestling with a Python, Lord Frederick Leighton



taylornugent:

art—gallery:

 An Athlete Wrestling with a Python, Lord Frederick Leighton



taylornugent:

art—gallery:

 An Athlete Wrestling with a Python, Lord Frederick Leighton

taylornugent:

art—gallery:

 An Athlete Wrestling with a Python, Lord Frederick Leighton

(via mythologer)